Understanding Dentistry Tools and Techniques

Hey there, it’s Myka Nussen here and I’d like to share my passion for dentistry with you. As a young child, I needed extensive dental work to pull my teeth straight and restore decayed surfaces. Although each session was a trying experience, my fascination for the process and results increased with each visit. I was absolutely astounded to see how beautiful my teeth looked after the procedures were complete. I will use this site to share information about dental procedures designed to restore teeth and create a gorgeous smile. I will talk about the purpose and benefits of each procedure to help patients feel comfortable with their treatment plan. I will explore tool upgrades and technique advancements in this field as well. I hope to inspire others to become passionate about dentistry through this site. Visit often to learn more.

How To Keep Your Mouth Guard Clean And Why It Matters To Your Health

If you wear a mouth guard due to participation in a contact sport or other activity, then you should take the time and effort to properly care for it. Poorly-cleaned and non-maintained mouth guards can make you sick. Below is what you should understand about the importance of keeping your mouth guard clean and a few best practices that you should follow to protect your health. Talk with a dentist if you have specific questions about keeping your mouth (and mouth guard) clean. Why practice proper sanitary care? There are over 600 known species of bacteria that regularly inhabit the mouths of humans, not to mention numerous viruses, protozoa and other single-celled organisms. Some of these minute creatures are the cause of not only tooth decay and gum disease but also other illnesses such as gastrointestinal infections and respiratory illness. The presence of these microorganisms is why you should make keeping your mouth guard clean a priority. By doing so, you will protect yourself and others from becoming ill. Clean and sterilize your mouth guard daily Whenever you are finished wearing your mouth guard for the day, take a few minutes to wash it thoroughly. Hold it under cool running water for several minutes to rinse off any loose particles of food or other debris, then use a soft-bristled toothbrush to gently scrub the guard. If you wish, you can use a solution of lukewarm water and mild liquid dish washing soap for additional cleaning, but never use hot water, as it might warp or deform your guard. In addition, do not use bleach on your mouth guard or...

4 Things You Need To Know About Gingival Abscesses

Most people have heard of tooth abscesses before, but you may not know that abscesses can form in other parts of your mouth, too. These painful pockets of pus can also form within your gum tissue, leading to gingival abscesses. Here are four things you need to know about this serious dental condition. What are the signs of gingival abscesses? If you have a gingival abscess, you may notice a bump on your gum tissue that looks like a pimple. You may also see an area of your gum tissue that is red and swollen. The area may also be painful. If the abscess breaks open, either on its own or due to the forces of brushing and eating, you will see (and taste) pus. If you notice any of these signs, make sure to see your dentist right away before the situation can get any more serious. What causes gingival abscesses? Gingival abscesses occur when bacteria gets inside your gum tissue and leads to an infection. Bacteria can enter your gums in a wide variety of ways. If you brush your teeth too aggressively, you could damage your gums and allow bacteria to get inside. Accidentally cutting your gum tissue with floss can have the same effect. Pieces of food that get stuck beneath your gums, like pieces of popcorn or seeds, can also introduce bacteria to the area. It’s important to be gentle when you brush and floss your teeth so that you don’t damage your gums. Take care when eating foods with small, sharp pieces and try to keep them from getting lodged in your gum...

3 Proven Strategies To Help Your Child Overcome Dental Anxiety

Pediatric dental anxiety is very common among young children, and oftentimes parents aren’t sure how to manage the situation. To help you help your child, consider implementing the three strategies below that will ensure their next trip to the dentist goes as smoothly as possible: Take Your Child to the Dentist from an Early Age Taking your child to the dentist is a bit like taking them to the hairdresser. Initially, they will have a bad reaction to this unusual procedure and will likely get upset. However, over time, they will become more comfortable with their surroundings and realize that there is really nothing scary about having work carried out. That’s why it is extremely important to familiarize your child with the dentist from an early age. Oftentimes, it is easy to submit to your child’s initial reaction and avoid taking them to the dentist until they are in dire need of treatment. However, taking this easy way out is a sure-fire way to build your child’s anxiety, as they haven’t been exposed to a dental clinic early in life. As such, you should take your child for regular checkups and maintenance work. This will allow them to become comfortable in dealing with a dentist through routine, non-invasive procedures. Over time, their confidence will grow to a point where they are so comfortable with the dental clinic that they won’t be scared when they require a filling or extraction. Understand Your Child’s Triggers Panic attacks rarely happen spontaneously. Rather, they occur in response to an external trigger that forces the body into “panic mode” as a form of defense....

5 Things Pregnant Women Need To Know About Periodontitis

Lots of changes happen throughout your body when you’re pregnant, and while you may have been expecting the morning sickness and the mood swings, you probably weren’t warned about the oral health problems that can come with pregnancy. During pregnancy, you are at risk of developing severe gum disease, also called periodontitis. Here’s what you need to know about this major oral health problem. What causes periodontitis? Bacteria inside your mouth cause periodontitis. When you brush and floss your teeth, these bacteria are cleaned away, but if you don’t clean your teeth well enough, the bacteria stays put and irritates your gum tissue. This leads to an infection of the gum tissue, called gingivitis. If this initial infection isn’t treated, it will spread from your gums to other parts of your mouth. When the infection reaches the ligaments and bones underneath your teeth, it is called periodontitis. What does pregnancy have to do with your gums? Periodontitis is caused by poor oral hygiene, but your pregnancy hormones can help to exacerbate the problem. When you’re pregnant, the levels of estrogen and progesterone in your body increase, and when this happens, more blood flows to your gum tissue. This makes your gums red and swollen, and also more susceptible to attacks by the bacteria inside your mouth. Do all pregnant women develop periodontitis? Getting pregnant doesn’t always lead to the development of severe gum disease, but it’s a fairly common problem. One study examined 810 pregnant women in the maternity ward of a teaching hospital and discovered that 11% of them had periodontitis. Gingivitis, the early stage of gum disease,...

5 Things You Need To Know About Inlays And Onlays

More than 90% of adults have had a cavity before, and more than one-quarter currently have an untreated cavity that needs to be repaired. These cavities can be repaired with fillings, but fillings aren’t the only way to fix tooth decay. Dentists can also use inlays and onlays to repair cavities. Here’s what you need to know about these restorations. What are inlays and onlays? Inlays and onlays are restorations made of composite resin, porcelain, or even gold. They are prepared outside of your mouth and then cemented in place, like crowns, instead of being allowed to harden inside your mouth like regular fillings. Inlays and onlays are very similar. Inlays don’t cover the biting surfaces of your tooth, just the center portion of the tooth. Onlays cover part or all of your biting surface and are used for larger areas of decay. When are these restorations used? Inlays and onlays are used to fix tooth decay in your back teeth, where the teeth need to withstand the forces of chewing and aesthetics don’t matter as much. Decay in the front teeth won’t be fixed in this way, since tooth-colored fillings or crowns will look better. Inlays and onlays are also good for severely decayed teeth that would be at risk of breaking if a filling was placed. Fillings can weaken your teeth by as much as 50%, leading to problems like cracks and breakage over time, since they can put pressure on your teeth when you chew. How does getting inlays or onlays compare to getting a filling? Most adults are familiar with the procedure for getting a...

Dental Health Going Downhill Since You Moved? 3 Ways Your New Home Environment Could Be To Blame

If you recently moved into a new home or apartment with roommates or with a significant other and your oral health has declined, you may think that the fact that your gums or teeth are not as healthy as before you moved is just a coincidence. It may not be as coincidental as you think, and it is a good idea to see if any changes in your home environment are to blame. The good news is that once you find out the culprit in your new environment that is leading to your dental health decline, including one of the following three factors, you and your housemates can work together to make your new home more oral-health friendly. 1. Roommates or Partners Who Smoke Most people who smoke know it is bad for their oral health as well as their overall health. People who live with smokers may not realize how much second-hand smoke harms their health, including their oral health. While many studies have been performed that show how second-hand smoke affects the health of lungs and general health of people exposed to it, few have studies the link between second-hand smoke and oral health – until now. A recent study was performed on people who live with or are frequently around smokers. They used a blood test to determine that these people had a nicotine metabolite in their bloodstream that was high enough to prove they had been exposed to smoke, but not high enough that they were determined to likely be smokers themselves. Among the group of people who were determined to be victims of second-hand...

What You Need To Know Before You Get Veneers

It seems cosmetic dentistry has a solution to just about every dental problem. One of those solutions is dental veneers, which fix a myriad of cosmetic dental problems. If you are considering porcelain veneers to fix your smile, check out these facts you must know before you take a seat in the dentist’s chair. They Can Give You a Straight, Full Smile While they don’t physically move teeth like braces, porcelain veneers give the appearance of a straight smile. If you have minor crooked or gapped teeth, the dentist can shape your teeth and position the veneers so they are flush with each other to look straight. On top of that, if you have chips in your teeth, short teeth, pointy teeth or your teeth are just not shaped to your liking, dental veneers can give you the look of square, full teeth. Veneers are not a good solution for severely crooked/gapped teeth, but they can fixed severely misshapen teeth. Inorganic Stains Are Hidden with Veneers In-office teeth whitening is a favorite cosmetic procedure to eliminate stains on teeth, but this treatment cannot correct inorganic stains or stains caused by trauma. Also, if you have small cracks in your enamel, the stains my reach the dentin, making them harder to whiten, or they may require whitening treatments more often. Veneers are a fast, effective way to whiten your teeth even when whitening treatments cannot help. Plus, the porcelain used to craft the veneers is extremely stain resistant, so they’ll stay whiter longer. The Procedure and Recovery Time Is Fast Getting porcelain veneers is a quick procedure. It usually requires...

Missing Tooth: Pros And Cons Of Dental Implants And Fixed Bridges

You’re missing a tooth, but it’s no big deal. Thanks to the great advances in cosmetic dentistry, you have many options to replace missing teeth other than dentures. Two of these options are dental implants and fixed bridges. Check out the advantages and disadvantages of each to see which is right for you. Dental Implant Pro: Powerful Durability   Dental implants are the most durable option for missing teeth. The reason behind this is a process called osseointegration. In simple terms, the titanium implant has the ability to fuse to your jawbone. This creates a hold that is just as powerful as natural teeth. In fact, with proper care, a dental implant can last you the rest of your life. Dental Implant Pro: Function Like Real Teeth Thanks to this durability, you treat the implant just like a natural tooth. It can withstand all the powerful pressure of daily chewing and wear and tear. It also looks exactly like a real tooth. With a dental implant, your jaw is stimulated, so it doesn’t shrink. A bridge, on the other hand, doesn’t stimulate your jaw, so the area shrinks, eventually revealing a gap between the tooth and gums. Dental Implant Con: Come With a High Cost Dental implants are great, but you pay for all those benefits. The cost for just the titanium implant and the crown on top is about $4250. However, dental implants often come with additional costs, including a bone graft if the jaw has already diminished. If the damaged tooth is still there, you’ll also have to pay for an extraction. Dental Implant Con: Long Procedure...

Reduce The Risk Of Cavities With Vegetables, Fruits And Water

Vegetables and fruits are praised for their heart-healthy properties, but they have benefits for more than just your heart. Fresh produce, along with water, help prevent cavities. Here’s how eating your daily dose of greens and fruits, and drinking a few glasses of water, could help reduce your risk of developing cavities. Crunchy Vegetables Crunchy vegetables act like natural toothbrushes when you chew them. While eating veggies is no substitute for properly brushing and flossing your teeth, their crisp texture helps scrub away other bits of food. According to Prevention, carrots and celery can even remove stains over time. Prevention also groups apples with these vegetables, claiming they have similar properties. Sour Fruits Saliva production fights against cavities. The more saliva your mouth produces, the harder it will be for malignant bacteria to create cavities. The European Food Information Council explains how saliva fights against bacteria. First, saliva kills some harmful bacteria that would otherwise grow in your mouth. Second, saliva continually washes away bacteria that is only loosely attached to teeth, before the microorganisms can firmly affix themselves. When you swallow, your saliva removes bacteria from your teeth and flushes it down your throat. The bacteria end up in your stomach, where acids kill them. Third, the proteins in your teeth that bacteria cling onto are also found in saliva. Since bacteria cannot tell whether a protein is part of a tooth or floating in your saliva, it will attach to either. The bacteria that attach to proteins in your saliva will eventually go down to your stomach, as explained above. Eating sour fruits is one way to...

Why Strengthen Your Tooth Enamel Before Removing Your Tooth Tattoo?

If you have a permanent tooth tattoo that you want to get rid of, speak to your dentist. Although removing the tattoo from your tooth enamel is often considered impossible, a dentist can remove the tattoo with a grinding tool, as well as restore your tooth with a dental crown or veneer. But it may take time to do so if your tooth enamel is too weak and damaged from the tattoo. Until you see your dentist for care, here’s what you should know about the tattoo’s effects on your tooth, and what you can do to strengthen your tooth enamel. What Happens to Your Tooth Enamel When You Have a Tooth Tattoo? Dentists typically use dental drills to etch and sculpt thin indentations on the surfaces of teeth crowns to create the tattoos. Even with careful brushing each day, food particles can build up inside the fine etchings, attract bacteria and weaken the enamel over time. In addition, the original placement of your tooth tattoo may make it prone to bacteria. For instance: The dentist who placed the tattoo may have drilled too deeply into the enamel during the placement of the tattoo. The ink leaked out of the tattoo’s etchings and spread beneath the enamel. The dentist placed the tattoo on a tooth that already had weak tooth enamel. Eventually, the bacteria release dangerous acids that prevent your tooth enamel from absorbing and using calcium and vitamin D. As a result, the enamel beneath and around your tooth tattoo breaks down. Once you lose tooth enamel to acid, you can’t grow it back. You may hear about ways to...